Anandway: Blog

Roadmaps to joy!

Art of Living Rudrabhishek Puja in Lucknow

Rudra puja Lucknow

Rudra Puja is an ancient practice followed in India since time immemorial. ‘Rudra’ means ‘Shiva - the Benevolent', ' the Destroyer of Evil'. 'Puja' means that which is born out of fullness. This Puja aims for inner peace and fulfillment. In this Puja, Lord Shiva is worshipped in his Rudra form. It is hailed by all Vedic scriptures as one of the greatest Pujas to remove all evils, to attain all desires and for all-round prosperity. Scriptures on Astrology prescribe this emphatically as a remedy for several planetary doshas.

When:
Where: 4/69 G Vineet Khand, Gomti Nagar, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Contact: 9839666706

Sudarshan Kriya Yoga recommended by Harvard University

A type of controlled breathing with roots in traditional yoga shows promise in providing relief for depression. The program, called Sudarshan Kriya yoga (SKY), involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating.

One study compared 30 minutes of SKY breathing, done six days a week, to bilateral electroconvulsive therapy and the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine in 45 people hospitalized for depression. After four weeks of treatment, 93% of those receiving electroconvulsive therapy, 73% of those taking imipramine, and 67% of those using the breathing technique had achieved remission.

Another study examined the effects of SKY on depressive symptoms in 60 alcohol-dependent men. After a week of a standard detoxification program at a mental health center in Bangalore, India, participants were randomly assigned to two weeks of SKY or a standard alcoholism treatment control. After the full three weeks, scores on a standard depression inventory dropped 75% in the SKY group, as compared with 60% in the standard treatment group. Levels of two stress hormones, cortisol and corticotropin, also dropped in the SKY group, but not in the control group. The authors suggest that SKY might be a beneficial treatment for depression in the early stages of recovery from alcoholism.

Read More

More about Sudarshan Kriya

गुरु मात पिता, गुरु बंधु सखा, तेरे चरणों में स्वामी मेरे कोटि प्रणाम

गुरु मात पिता, गुरु बंधु सखा, तेरे चरणों में स्वामी मेरे कोटि प्रणाम

१. प्रियताम तुम्हीं, प्राणनाथ तुम्हीं, तेरे चरणों में स्वामी मेरे कोटि प्रणाम

२. तुम्हीं भक्ति हो, तुम्हीं शक्ति हो, तुम्हीं मुक्ति हो, मेरे सांब शिवा

३. तुम्हीं प्रेरणा, तुम्हीं  साधना, तुम्हीं आराधना मेरे सांब शिवा

४. तुम्हीं प्रेम हो, तुम्हीं करुणा हो, तुम्हीं मोक्ष हो मेरे सांब शिवा

Why do we ring the bell in a temple?

Q: Guruji, Why do we ring the bell in a temple?

Sri Sri Ravi Shankar: Because there are so many thoughts wandering in your mind, with the sound of the bells you come into the present. Your thoughts come to a halt.
The drummers beat large drums, play the Naadaswaram, shehnai, bells, and conch. All these sounds are made so that your mind becomes quieter.
Your mind is like a kid. When a kid is crying, you cry louder than the kid and the kid becomes quiet. Have you noticed that? In the same way, when there is so much noise in your mind and too many thoughts, they blow the conch, ring the bell and with all the sounds, the mind comes to the present moment.
With so much noise around, the mind cannot think. It cannot wander. So it is used as a technique.
All outside sounds suppress the sound of the mind for a little while. This short-term suppression should lead the mind to silence. Once it goes into the depths of meditation, all words feel burdensome. But when the mind is full of words, and you are troubled by too many thoughts, these sounds bring relief. Have you seen in the Buddhist monastery, there is a big gong? They ring the gong and that vibration will keep you silent. So, from sound to silence, the journey is very important.

Tag Cloud