Anandway: Blog

Roadmaps to joy!

House guests in Lucknow?

House-guests could well be Lucknow’s answer to extending Lucknawi Mehman-nawazi to foreign and domestic visitors in a big way.

Chikan embroidery and Kebabs may be enjoying international fame, but Lucknow’s tehzeeb that originally lured many in search of El Dorado to settle right here, is yet to reclaim its claim to fame. Lucknow as a cultural destination is hugely undersold, feel eminent Lucknowites. More...

Bhaktivardhini by Vallabhacharya, Sanskrit text

Bhaktivardhini is a Sanskrit text written by Mahaprabhu Vallabhacharya. This poem advocates for devotion as a tool for spiritual development. Vallabhacharya was the founder of Pushtimarg, a Vaishnav tradition that considers love to be a primary tool for knowing God. More...

Gajendra Moksha, Sanskrit text

Gajendra moksha episode occurs in Srimad Bhagwat Purana's Canto 8, Chapters 2, 3 & 4. It is the story of an elephant king, Gajendra, who was rich and successful in life, and enjoyed all the trappings that come with wealth. Yet, when in serious danger from crocodile Graah, none of his friends and riches offered help. He then prayed to God, who helped him instanteously. Sage Shukdev narrated this episode to king Parikshit. The literary value of this text is par excellence as is its power to guide towards spiritual evolution.More...

Venu Geet, Sanskrit text

Venu Geet, Srimad Bhagwat
Venu Geet, is a popular excerpt from Srimad Bhagwat Mahapurana, written by Krishna Dvaipayana Maharshi Ved Vyas. Venu Geet appears in Srimad Bhagwatam's Canto 10. Venu geet is sung by the Gopis in praise of Krishna and his flute. It is an account of the Gopis reacting to the sound of Krishna's flute as he herded cows in the surrounding jungle. Venu Geet vividly describes Krishna, the natural surroundings of Vrindavan, River Yamuna, trees, bamboo bushes, birds, deers, clouds, apsaras and simple women, and of course the cows and calves responding to the song of love that the flute brings to those receptive to it. More...

Meera bai bhajan - Mharo pranam Banke Bihari

Braj sahitya literature evolved around Krishna in Brajbhoomi - Vrindavan and its surrounding areas. Braj sahitya has lived in the oral tradition through music. Bhajan, sawaiya, dohe, pad, shloka, styles of writing poetry all find a place here. Similarly, the languages are as varied as the tongues that devotees' could speak. Sanskrit, the local dialect Braj-bhasha, Bangla, Marwari, and more regional dialects find place in Braj literature.

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This Meera bhajan, sung by Kishori Amonkar is a fine example of Braj literature. This song is a greeting to Banke Bihari. It also describes him and Radha.More...

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